Drysiut Drying Times


Trial Conditions

For trials the drysuits were washed thoroughly and rinsed with cold water inside and out. This is the “worst case” for drying time.
A suit which is only wet at the cuffs or has damp boots will dry much faster.
Using 2 TriDri units will reduce the time further.
Similar results are obtained with membrane and neoprene suits.
Trials have been performed to simulate conditions normally available.

Result

Trials in a cold residential garage 
•    Temperature 10°C to 12°C
•    External doors closed. 
•    Drying time 11 hours
This is the total time for the whole suit to dry from completely wet using only one TriDri as in “How to use TriDri“. (One leg dried for 6 hours then TriDri changed to the other leg for 5 hours).
Some variation of time is to be expected particularly for absorbent braces. Suits which are not completely soaked and are only damp will dry much more quickly.

Comparison with and without TriDri – The Boots

When they get wet, the boots of a drysuit usually take longest to dry; these trials concentrate on the boots.
Again the drysuits were washed thoroughly and rinsed with cold water inside and out.
     Cold Garage
Temperature 10°C to 12°C
•    External doors           Closed
•    Boot drying time       3.5 hours - with TriDri
•    Boot drying time       14 days - without TriDri
     Warm Bathroom
Temperature 20°C to 22°C
•    Doors                        Closed
•    Boot drying time       2.2 hours - with TriDri
•    Boot drying time       9 days - without TriDri
 
In both cases the boot with TriDri dries approximately 100 times faster.
In these trials we consider the boot to be dry when it is dry at the interface with the more flexible part of the suit.

Other Factors

The drying time depends on a number of factors including: Temperature, Humidity, the initial wetness of suit, how well it is hung to drain and the amount of webbing. Because of these variables we cannot guarantee the above times but we believe that they fairly represent the performance of TriDri